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this table is sad… on LensCulture Network Gallery

A selection of images from my series ‘this table is sad because no one is sitting at it’ is featured on the LensCulture Network Gallery through October/November 2017.

this table is sad because no one is sitting at it

night swans – this table is sad because no one is sitting at it

“I find myself repeatedly passing through my life without actually engaging with it, going through the motions but my mind elsewhere. When I am lost in my inner thoughts those inhabiting the outer world around me disappear, and I too cease to exist. My awareness of this state creates a duality of experience through which I struggle to re-engage with the present.” 

This series employs a twin lens photographic technique, to record a parallax effect that forces a continual re-evaluation of the everyday transitory moment

This is a really personal body of work, so I’m very pleased that LensCulture have included it.  Here’s a link to my project on the gallery (until End Nov 2017), and here’s a link to the work in my LensCulture Portfolio, along with some of my other projects.

You can also buy a 48 page book of the full series of images, printed on high quality pearl paper, through blurb.

LensCulture is one of the most authoritative resources for contemporary photography, committed to discovering and promoting the best of the global photography community. The LensCulture Network offers committed photographers a place to show their work on a global stage and advance in their personal practice. The Gallery is a curated showcase of the Network members’ projects—our editors choose from members’ work, whether newly published images or great series that never received deserved attention.

 

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Ophelia in fLIP #37

My Ophelia series has been selected for the Summer 2017 issue of fLIP. Issue 37 features work on the themes of storytelling.

Ophelia #3

Ophelia #3

Ophelia is featured in the My Way section of the magazine where photographers talk in depth about their motivation and approach.

fLIP is published 3 times a year by London Independent Photography. The magazine aims to showcase photography and engage readers in a wider dialogue about diverse approaches.

Copies cost £4 and are available directly from the London Independent Photography website, or from the Photographers Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery bookshops in London.

Chasing Shadows and Ophelia in the LensCulture Explore pages

LensCulture have included my projects Chasing Shadows, and Ophelia, along with lots of other great work in their Explore pages under Black & White, and Alternative Processes, respectively.

Chasing Shadows - steps

Chasing Shadows (steps) – silver gelatin lith print

 

lc-explore-bw-chasing-shadows

LensCulture Explore – black and white

 

Ophelia #1 - Polaroid emulsion lift

Ophelia #1 – Polaroid emulsion lift

 

lc-explore-alternative-ophelia

LensCulture Explore – alternative processes

Established in 2004, LensCulture has a global audience of over 700,000 people, and is one of the most authoritative resources for contemporary photography, committed to discovering and promoting the best of the global photography community.

Thank you LensCulture for supporting my work!

LensCulture Network

Thank you LensCulture for inviting me to join the LensCulture Network!

The LensCulture Network is an invitation only community of exceptional photographers (their words!) Members have either won awards, grants or fellowships from respected organisations worldwide, or have been among the top 5% of highly-rated entries to LensCulture competitions.

You can see photographers’ work on the LensCulture Network Gallery – here’s a screenshot of my project – Chasing Shadows on there:

lensculture network gallery.jpeg

 

There’s some absolutely wonderful work on the gallery page; it’s a real privilege to be included alongside so many great photographers!

Here’s also a link to my LensCulture profile.

Launched in 2014 by Jim Casper, LensCulture has become one of the most authoritative resources for contemporary photography, committed to discovering and promoting the best of the global photography community.

Shutterhub Open

I’m very happy to be taking part in this year’s Shutter Hub Open – a month of photography exhibitions and events across Cambridge from 24th June until 24th July 2016.

Shutter Hub is an organisation providing opportunities, support and networking for creative photographers worldwide.

My photograph – North London street, reflected – will be on display in STIR coffee shop as part of an exhibition spanning three Cambridge venues.

The full programme for the Shutter Hub Open 2016 can be found at http://shutterhub.org.uk/blog/OPEN2016, including talks, workshops and a portfolio review.

North London street, reflected

North London street, reflected

 

STIR is at 253 Chesterton Road, Cambridge CB4 1BG.  www.stircambridge.co.uk

You can see the exhibition  from 24th June:

Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, Fri, Sat – 8AM – 6PM

or Sun – 9AM – 5PM

Private View: 24 June 2016, 6PM to 8PM* 

The other two exhibition venues are:

HOT NUMBERS COFFEE, Gwydir St, Cambridge, CB1 2LJ 

Private View: 22 June 2016, 7PM to 9.30PM*

Mon, Tue, Wed, Sat – 7.15AM to 6PM
Thurs, Fri – 7.15AM to 10.30PM
Sun – 8AM to 8PM

www.hotnumberscoffee.co.uk

 

NOVI, 12 Regent Street, Cambridge, CB2 1DB

Private View: 23 June 2016, 7PM to 9.30PM*

Open Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, Fri, Sat – 9AM – 3 AM,
Sun – 9AM – 11PM

www.novicambridge.co.uk

 

*Private Views are free to attend, please RSVP to info@shutterhub.org.uk

 

The 2016 Shutter Hub Open is sponsored by Metro Imaging and supported by Anglia Ruskin University, PhotoVoice, Novi, Hot Numbers Coffee, Stir, Cambridge School of Art, Art at the Alison Richard Building

Another juxtaposition

A few of my photographs have been included in the tumblr blog: black mountain mass.  The blog presents passages of text alongside photographs and other artists images found on the internet. It’s a great site to lose yourself in.

My images, from ‘this table is sad…‘ and ‘I Keep Diamonds…‘, have been placed with lines from John Tyndall’s ‘The Glaciers of the Alps’.

Here are the posts (click through them to get to the blog):

Ophelia’s travels

I found one of my Ophelia photographs on a blog.  I think it is a Portuguese writer, mixing images and text – here’s the link: casaetextodaana

Ophelia #3

Ophelia #3

My photograph was accompanied by a long passage; the translation, although clumsy (I just pasted the original text into Google translate), is still beautiful and sad:

“I dreamed of you tonight. You who have the eye color of honey and when exposed to the sun shines.

Clarissa had the kindness of a few, a respect for life. He told me he felt a huge void, and the rebates he passed went back and forth, made her tremble and spend hours in bed. I never understood why she, so beautiful and intelligent could not ignore the ugly.

From an early age, even if not old enough to read, insisted that teach. Connecting the dots of the letters, united the words, pretending to read the comic books. As a teenager, wrote poetry … if locked-hours in the room with Clarice in hand. I read several times the same lines. He copied in the diary that he thought more beautiful. That was all for her. I want to remind you, but sometimes I forget your face shape.

There was a time in which succumbed. Not left, not studying, not read, did not eat. Doctors indicated drugs she took not. Smell your journal. Spend my finger that lock of hair you gave me.

Clarissa spent the days without knowing why he lived. And I, who both loved her, did not understand why she feel that way. Like everything else in his life, it was determined in ending with his grief. His decision kills me. In the dream I had today you turned a water bubble and dissolved.

I wonder what was the last thing you thought. They want me to forget you. No longer meet with Clarissa nor I will see her beautiful eyes and shiny hair. Still, constantly I think about what I would say to her. I would say that sadly nearly over. I think her so much. I try to believe in something since gone.”

Ophelia is a series of Polaroid Emulsion Lifts onto water colour paper made in response to studying previous artistic interpretations of Shakespeare’s text. The series studies the destruction and turmoil that lies beneath the romanticism and serenity suggested in traditional representations of her fate, both in image and process.

This photograph was also used previously for the cover of River Wolton’s anthology of poems: Leap.